Columbus Clinic is currently offering serological tests for the detection of antibodies against the SARS- CoV-2 virus.

This is a blood test designed to determine if a person has developed antibodies to COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease.)

It is possible to book an appointment for the blood test by calling +39 02 480801.

In order to comply with the Clinic’s safety measures, intended to ensure that the facility remains “COVID-Free”, only the patient will be allowed inside. Our schedules are drawn up with due regard to a safe crowding index.

Serological testing does not replace the detection of viral RNA carried out through molecular tests (nasopharyngeal swab) which, according to the indications of the Public Health Institute (ISS), is currently the only reliable diagnostic test.

The presence of anti SARS- CoV-2 antibodies indicates that the infection has occurred, but, at present, it cannot guarantee immunity to COVID-19 Coronavirus disease.

 

FURTHER DETAILS

The test is recommended for all those who suspect they may have been infected and have not already had a positive swab result.

Since participation in the testing is voluntary, the participant must be perfectly informed about the meaning of the results.

The ECLIA serology test simultaneously detects the presence of IgG and IgM immunoglobulins, with a specificity rate of 99.8% and a sensitivity rate greater than 95%.

Immunoglobulins M (IgM) are the first type of antibodies produced in the presence of a foreign pathogen, as part of the body’s primary immune response. Therefore, they can provide an early indication of a recent infection.

Immunoglobulins G (IgG), also known as “Gamma globulins”, are produced in a more delayed timescale and are normally associated with immunological defense and memory. At present, their protection role and lifespan are uncertain.

The execution of the screening, the result of the serology test, as well as the swab test if required, will be communicated to the patient’s local ATS.

 

TEST RESULTS SUMMARY

 

RESULT IN THE REPORT
WHAT DOES IT MEAN? WHAT SHOULD I DO?
NEGATIVE IgG NEGATIVE IgM Absence of previous infection or very recent infection (less than 7 days) such that the subject has not yet developed the antibody response to the virus, or the infection has generated an IgG antibody response below the detection level of the test The test should be repeated after 7 days to exclude the infection
NEGATIVE IgG POSITIVE IgM Possible ongoing infection. It is possible that the subject has been exposed to the SARS- CoV-2 virus. If the serology test is positive, the patient’s infection must be verified by looking for viral SARS- CoV-2 sequences from a nasopharyngeal swab Contact your doctor and follow the instructions of the local health authorities

See notes (*)

POSITIVE IgG NEGATIVE IgM Possible immunization against Covid-19 virus. It is possible that the subject has produced antibodies. A positive IgG antibody test does not inform about the protective capacity of the antibodies nor about their longer-term trends. If the serology test is positive, the patient’s infection must be verified by looking for viral SARS- CoV-2 sequences from a nasopharyngeal swab  

A residual infectious risk cannot be excluded

See notes (*)

POSITIVE IgG POSITIVE IgM Possible ongoing infection. If the serology test is positive, the patient’s infection must be verified by looking for viral SARS- CoV-2 sequences from a nasopharyngeal swab  

Contact your doctor and follow the instructions of the local health authorities

See notes (*)

 

 

(*) IMPORTANT

If the serology test (IgG, IgM or IgG / IgM) is positive, the patient must book an appointment to take a nasopharyngeal swab test, which searches for viral RNA in order to exclude the presence of the virus and its contagiousness.

While waiting for the swab, the patient:

  • must not leave his/her home;
  • must isolate at home;
  • must follow the prescriptions aimed at preventing the spread of the infection;
  • must promptly report the positive outcome of the serology test to his/her General Practitioner

If the swab test is negative and the patient is asymptomatic, it is possible to immediately end the quarantine and return to social life.

If, instead, the swab test is positive, the patient will continue the quarantine as prescribed by the Health Authorities and, in any case, until the test result is negative, which is ascertained by two negative swabs 24 hours apart.